Botanical Gardens Los Angeles

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Botanical Gardens Los Angeles

Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens Recommended You’ll find cultural glories inside the library’s impressive book collection—the bequest of entrepreneur Henry E. Huntington—but the Huntington’s highlights are outdoors in its vast jigsaw of botanical gardens, arguably the most glorious in the entire Los Angeles region. The acres and acres of public gardens are divided into a variety of themes, including a prickly desert garden, a serene Japanese garden and bamboo forest, as well as an ever-expanding assembly of Chinese pagodas, pavilions and bridges. Read more San Marino Descanso Gardens This delightful tribute to the horticultural magic of Southern California includes more than 600 varieties of camellia (these are best seen between the middle of February and early May, when there are around 34,000 of the plants in bloom) and some five acres of roses. There are also lilac, orchid, fern and California native plant areas, as well as a tea house donated by the Japanese-American community. Book now Read more La Cañada Advertising Los Angeles County Arboretum & Botanical Garden These gorgeous grounds in Arcadia, very close to the Santa Anita racetrack, have been designed as an educational facility (the plants are mostly arranged by region, and tours are available), but many people simply come here for a little peace and quiet. You could wander these gardens for hours, taking in tropical forests and waterfalls, trees and fish. Plus, be on the lookout for wild peacocks. Read more Arcadia Los Angeles Zoo and Botanical Gardens The LA Zoo’s greatest asset is its location in the isolated hills of Griffith Park. It’s a pretty popular place, but the zoo’s size—80 acres, plus a huge parking lot—means that, like the park itself, it rarely feels busy. There’s not a separate botanical garden here, but you will find over 800 different plant species, from native succulents to prehistoric cycads, labeled and catalogued throughout the zoo’s continentally-themed habitats. Read more Griffith Park Advertising South Coast Botanic Garden This South Bay botanic garden covers 87 acres on the northeast side of the Palos Verdes Peninsula. You’ll find a mix of Southern California flora, from fuchsia to the talngled roots of Moreton Bay Fig trees, alonside more specialized areas like small Japanese and desert gardens. It may not be as grandiose as some other gardens, but it’s well worth the price of admission. Book now Read more Rancho Palos Verdes/Rolling Hills Estates James Irvine Japanese Garden This tranquil garden is one of Little Tokyo’s best-kept secrets as the urban oasis isn’t accessible from the street. According to the community center, gardens carry great importance in Japanese culture—caring for the grounds is a form of art and spending time among the flora encourages harmony with nature—so walk the outer path for a complete view of the garden’s foliage, babbling stream and cascading waterfall. Read more Little Tokyo Advertising The Japanese Garden This appropriately titled Japanese garden sits just across from the Sepulveda Basin on the border of Van Nuys. The stony bridges and footpaths wind along a central pond, flanked by by rockwork, manicured trees and tea houses. Of course, this wouldn’t be the Valley without a bit of an industrial edge—the garden is irrigated by the adjacent Donald C. Tillman Water Reclamation Plant. Read more Van Nuys Storrier Stearns Japanese Garden This nearly two-acre private Japanese garden and traditional teahouse opens its doors to the public on a weekly basis. First constructed in the late 1930s and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2005, the garden features two ponds, four bridges and a cascading waterfall, all centered around a Japanese tea house. Created in Japan by landscape designer and craftsman Kinzuchi Fujii, the original tea house was shipped to philanthropists Charles and Ellamae Storrier Stearns’ backyard. It sat there until 1981 when it burned down; current owners Jim and Connie Haddad have since rebuilt and restored the tatami mat tea house according to original drawings, photographs and architectural plans. Read more Pasadena Advertising

Botanical Gardens Los Angeles

Most visitors to the Los Angeles Zoo and Botanical Gardens come to see the animals. What is often overlooked is the vital connections between the fauna and the flora. The plants that provide food, shade, and even entertainment are every bit as important as the animals—a fact that is as crucial in the wild as it is in the Zoo. One of the fundamental principles of conservation is habitat preservation, and at the foundation of every habitat on earth are plants.There are three main groups of plants at the Zoo, many of which overlap. Often the trees that fill the landscape (acacia, eucalyptus, ficus, mulberry) also provide food for the animals, commonly known as “browse.” Additionally, the Zoo’s plant collection includes many intriguing specimen plants—examples of unusual or distinctive species such as the Chilean wine palm, bald cypress, and cycads. Zoo grounds also feature special gardens that highlight groups of plants. The native gardens present many of this region’s spectacular indigenous plants, while the cactus and succulent gardens contain representatives of arid climates around the world, and the cycad garden is a living time capsule full of plant species that have been in existence since the age of dinosaurs.As you stroll Zoo grounds, take some time out to appreciate the botanical bounty around you, and when you observe the animal residents, remember that the key to the survival of their wild counterparts is preserving the environment that is their home and that includes native plants.Frequently Asked Questions» Read More…Botanical Background» Read More…Botanical Highlights» Read More…

Botanical Gardens Los Angeles

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Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens Recommended You’ll find cultural glories inside the library’s impressive book collection—the bequest of entrepreneur Henry E. Huntington—but the Huntington’s highlights are outdoors in its vast jigsaw of botanical gardens, arguably the most glorious in the entire Los Angeles region. The acres and acres of public gardens are divided into a variety of themes, including a prickly desert garden, a serene Japanese garden and bamboo forest, as well as an ever-expanding assembly of Chinese pagodas, pavilions and bridges. Read more

Botanical Gardens Los Angeles

The 21 best parks in Los Angeles Among the lengthy list of picturesque attractions in this city—who can resist the temptation of a hike through Runyon, an afternoon in a botanical garden or a trip to the beach?—there is a wealth of beautiful parks in Los Angeles. Whether you’re an art aficionado or a devoted dog owner, there’s a slice of nature that fits your lifestyle. For those days when you don’t feel like climbing up all 282 steps at the Baldwin Hills Scenic Overlook, roll out a blanket or take a stroll through 21 of the best (and free) parks in Los Angeles. Read more

Botanical Gardens Los Angeles

Related Lists Mary, quite contrary, how your garden grow, girl? Botanical gardens, arboretums, & nurseries Nature Abounds Parks, forests, botanical gardens, zoos, and anything with nature. Supporting the Arts Music, museums, art galleries, and botanical gardens. More Lists

Botanical Gardens Los Angeles

Los Angeles—and California as a whole—is a pretty amazing place, botanically speaking. Stick practically any plant in the ground and it’ll grow, hence the palm tree-lined streets and the ubiquitous jacaranda tree bloom. Even though some of us can reach out our windows and pluck an avocado from a tree, a trip to one of LA’s many botanical gardens reveals vegetation that simply can’t be found on our city streets. We’ve rounded up some of our favorites, from botanical gardens in the San Gabriel Valley to a hidden oasis in a Hollywood Hills park.

Botanical Gardens Los Angeles

Los Angeles Zoo and Botanical Gardens The LA Zoo’s greatest asset is its location in the isolated hills of Griffith Park. It’s a pretty popular place, but the zoo’s size—80 acres, plus a huge parking lot—means that, like the park itself, it rarely feels busy. There’s not a separate botanical garden here, but you will find over 800 different plant species, from native succulents to prehistoric cycads, labeled and catalogued throughout the zoo’s continentally-themed habitats. Read more

Botanical Gardens Los Angeles

(credit: Descanso Gardens) Descanso Gardens 1418 Descanso Drive La Cañada Flintridge, CA 91011 949-4200 www.descansogardens.org A whopping 150 acres of carefully curated landscape, Descanso Gardens will buy your attention for many more than just one visit. Once the La Cañada Flintridge property of early 20th century newspaper mogul E. Manchester Boddy, who used this outpost as a commercial camellia garden, the popular site came under the auspices of Los Angeles County more than 60 years ago. Notable among the blooms are a rosarium, a lilac garden and a bird sanctuary, all reached on foot or via the Descanso Gardens Enchanted Railroad, a diesel train that is one eighth the size of the actual model.

(credit: Joan S./Yelp) Mildred E. Mathias Botanical Garden University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) 100 Stein Plaza Drive Los Angeles, CA 90095 825-1260 www.botgard.ucla.edu Named after the noted botanist, this special garden started as a UCLA laboratory in 1929. The frost-free retreat is filled to the brim with tropicals and sub-tropicals like ferns, palms, eucalyptus and figs. All of the 1,500 different plant species are organized by geographic as well as taxonomic and cultural needs, showing visitors the way certain specimens relate to one another. With that in mind, go and expect to become acquainted with desert plants, shrubs true to a Mediterranean climate, a plethora of plants native to Hawaii and many more. Tours are available for groups of eight or more.

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