Garden Planting Guide

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Garden Planting Guide

Gardening by the Moon Calendar from the Farmers’ Almanac The Farmers Almanac Gardening by the Moon Calendar is determined by our age-old formula and applies generally to regions where the climate is favorable. Because the gardening calendar is based on the phase and position of the Moon, it is consistent across all growing zones. Recommended dates are still “weather permitting,” and you should talk with your local greenhouse or agricultural extension office for the optimal window of time within which to use these dates. Farmers’ Almanac’s Gardening by the Moon Calendar is available here for 2 months and if you sign up for a FREE account with us, we’ll give you 4 months! June 20172nd-4th Sow grains and forage crops. Plant flowers. Favorable for planting peas, beans, tomatoes, and other fall crops bearing aboveground.5th-6th Plant seedbeds. Extra good for planting fall lettuce, cabbage, cauliflower, collards, and other leafy vegetables. All aboveground crops planted now will do well.7th-9th Poor planting days, cut hay or do general farm work.10th-11th Plant late beets, potatoes, onions, carrots, and other root crops.12th-14th Poor days for planting. Kill plant pests, spray, fertilize, do general farm work.15th-16th Set strawberry plants. Excellent for any vine crops such as beans, peas, and cucumbers. Good days for transplanting. Favorable time for planting late root crops.17th-18th Cut hay or do plowing on these barren days.19th-20th Good days for transplanting. Good days for planting root crops.21st-22nd Seeds planted now tend to rot in ground.23rd-24th Excellent for sowing seedbeds and flower gardens. Plant tomatoes, beans, peppers, corn, cotton, and other aboveground crops on these most fruitful days.25th-29th Poor period for planting. Kill plant pests, clear fencerows, or clear land.30th Sow grains and forage crops. Plant flowers. Favorable for planting peas, beans, tomatoes, and other fall crops bearing aboveground.July 20171st Sow grains and forage crops. Plant flowers. Favorable for planting peas, beans, tomatoes, and other fall crops bearing aboveground.2nd-4th Start seedbeds. Extra good for fall cabbage, lettuce, cauliflower, mustard greens, and other leafy vegetables. Good for any aboveground crop that can be planted now.5th-6th Barren days, neither plant nor sow.7th-9th First two days are when any aboveground crops that can be planted now will do well. Last day is a good day for planting beets, carrots, salsify, Irish potatoes, and other root crops.10th-11th Good days for killing weeds, briars, and other plant pests. Poor for planting.12th-13th Set strawberry plants. Good days for transplanting. Good days for planting beets, carrots, radishes, salsify, turnips, peanuts, and other root crops. Also good for vine crops.14th-16th A barren period.17th-18th A barren period.19th-20th Poor days for planting, seeds tend to rot in ground.21st-22nd Plant seedbeds and flower gardens. Good days for transplanting. Most fruitful days for planting root crops.23rd-26th A most barren period. Kill plant pests and do general farm work.27th-28th Sow grains and forage crops. Plant flowers. Favorable for planting peas, beans, tomatoes, and other fall crops bearing aboveground.29th-31st Start seedbeds. Extra good for fall cabbage, lettuce, cauliflower, mustard greens, and other leafy vegetables. Good for any aboveground crop that can be planted now.August 20171st-2nd Cut winter wood, do clearing and plowing, but no planting. Get all 12 months of our exclusive Gardening by the Moon Calendar inside the Farmers’ Almanac (available in our online store). This calendar lists favorable and not so favorable dates for various gardening and farming chores.

Garden Planting Guide

June 20172nd-4th Sow grains and forage crops. Plant flowers. Favorable for planting peas, beans, tomatoes, and other fall crops bearing aboveground.5th-6th Plant seedbeds. Extra good for planting fall lettuce, cabbage, cauliflower, collards, and other leafy vegetables. All aboveground crops planted now will do well.7th-9th Poor planting days, cut hay or do general farm work.10th-11th Plant late beets, potatoes, onions, carrots, and other root crops.12th-14th Poor days for planting. Kill plant pests, spray, fertilize, do general farm work.15th-16th Set strawberry plants. Excellent for any vine crops such as beans, peas, and cucumbers. Good days for transplanting. Favorable time for planting late root crops.17th-18th Cut hay or do plowing on these barren days.19th-20th Good days for transplanting. Good days for planting root crops.21st-22nd Seeds planted now tend to rot in ground.23rd-24th Excellent for sowing seedbeds and flower gardens. Plant tomatoes, beans, peppers, corn, cotton, and other aboveground crops on these most fruitful days.25th-29th Poor period for planting. Kill plant pests, clear fencerows, or clear land.30th Sow grains and forage crops. Plant flowers. Favorable for planting peas, beans, tomatoes, and other fall crops bearing aboveground.July 20171st Sow grains and forage crops. Plant flowers. Favorable for planting peas, beans, tomatoes, and other fall crops bearing aboveground.2nd-4th Start seedbeds. Extra good for fall cabbage, lettuce, cauliflower, mustard greens, and other leafy vegetables. Good for any aboveground crop that can be planted now.5th-6th Barren days, neither plant nor sow.7th-9th First two days are when any aboveground crops that can be planted now will do well. Last day is a good day for planting beets, carrots, salsify, Irish potatoes, and other root crops.10th-11th Good days for killing weeds, briars, and other plant pests. Poor for planting.12th-13th Set strawberry plants. Good days for transplanting. Good days for planting beets, carrots, radishes, salsify, turnips, peanuts, and other root crops. Also good for vine crops.14th-16th A barren period.17th-18th A barren period.19th-20th Poor days for planting, seeds tend to rot in ground.21st-22nd Plant seedbeds and flower gardens. Good days for transplanting. Most fruitful days for planting root crops.23rd-26th A most barren period. Kill plant pests and do general farm work.27th-28th Sow grains and forage crops. Plant flowers. Favorable for planting peas, beans, tomatoes, and other fall crops bearing aboveground.29th-31st Start seedbeds. Extra good for fall cabbage, lettuce, cauliflower, mustard greens, and other leafy vegetables. Good for any aboveground crop that can be planted now.August 20171st-2nd Cut winter wood, do clearing and plowing, but no planting. Get all 12 months of our exclusive Gardening by the Moon Calendar inside the Farmers’ Almanac (available in our online store). This calendar lists favorable and not so favorable dates for various gardening and farming chores.

Garden Planting Guide

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Almost any article on companion planting references the Native American “Three Sister Planting”. This age old grouping involves growing corn, beans and squash – often pumpkin – in the same area. As the corn stalks grow, beans naturally find support by climbing up the stalk. Beans, as all legumes, fix nitrogen in the soil, which supports the large nutritional needs of corn. Squash grows rapidly and the large squash leaves shade out weeds and serve as natural weed block. Good plant companions work in support of each other.

Garden Planting Guide

I have been searching for the instructions for planting some vegetables that I could be harvest on my garden and I have got it. This Growing Vegetables table or sheet has included useful elements very wisely because here I have found various kinds of vegetables, its suite conditions & and useful information to harvest it with systemically. Actually I loved Cauliflower and I’m too much interested to plant it on my garden, also Celery and Tomatoes too. Last time I had try to plant Cauliflower, but it didn’t harvest properly and all my Cauliflower became brown and wasted. All my hard works are had been become worse. Even now, I would be fertilizing Cauliflower properly with the help of this information.

Garden Planting Guide

As in city planning, the way your lay your vegetable garden out is crucial. Avoid planting vegetables in large patches or long rows and interplant with flowers and herbs. Large groupings of one type of vegetable serve as a beacon to problematic pests. If you mix in flowers and herbs, it becomes more difficult for pests to find your veggies. The scent of flowers and herbs, as well as the change up in color, is thought to confuse pests. Certain flowers and herbs attract beneficial insects to your garden.

Garden Planting Guide

Hi Nick, First -be sure you are planting the right seeds for the season- warm season plants vs cool season plants. Here in sunny CA most of our seed packets are offered year round, which makes for a lot of confusion as to what to plant when. Second- there are some seeds that need to be planted directly into the soil..the transplanted seedlings just don’t do well. Recheck the seed packets description.. those that say> plant directly into the soil after last frost, are most often the ones that don’t like being sprouted then transplanted. Third- you need to “harden off” your seedlings before they go into the garden. Meaning, move the sprouts in their flats outside in mostly shade for a couple of days, then move them into a bit longer time in sun after a couple of days and then move them into more sun etc. Make sure you protect them from the pests and birds -just as you do in the garden, after a week or so you can start to transplant.

Garden Planting Guide

Garden Planting Guide

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