Lawn Maintenance Contract

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Lawn Maintenance Contract

1. Include the basics. Make sure the contract has a space for the name of your business, your name, the customer’s name and address and the date. Make sure that your business license and bonding information are posted clearly on the contract. Include the date the service is scheduled to begin and how frequently you will work on the lawn. If it won’t always be you completing the work, clearly state in the contract who might be working on the lawn.

Lawn Maintenance Contract

2. Talk about money. Your contract should state how much the customer will be paying per servicing and what will happen if they fail to pay. For example, the contract may read, “Customer is to pay for services by the last day of each month. If, after a grace period of seven day, payment has not be received, lawn service will cease until customer pays all monies owed.” Make a provision for what happens if you fail to fulfill your end of the contract. It may read something like, “If, for any reason, contractor is unable to fulfill his duties, he will contact property owner and arrange another time to work on property at a price discounted by 15 percent.”

Lawn Maintenance Contract

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You can price your services in many different ways. One way is to price it per cut. This could be could be weekly, bi-weekly, or on an as-needed basis. You could also have an annual 12-month contract. Just remember that if the contract is automatically renewed, the client may want written confirmation. Be sure to note your cancellation policy.

Lawn Maintenance Contract

3. Outline services you will provide. If you’re going to mow, trim, weed and dispose of yard waste, spell it out in the contract. If there is an exclusion, make it clear as well. For example, if the property owner keeps dogs in the yard, let him know if picking up feces is or is not your responsibility. If you’ll provide services such as dog waste removal for an extra fee, the contract should clearly outline the amount of the fee.

Lawn Maintenance Contract

Contracts are written for your protection. A clearly worded contract can prevent misunderstandings on both parts, spell out what you will and will not be responsible for, and serves as a promise from your customer that you are going to be paid for your services. Writing a lawn-care service agreement won’t take you much time, but might save you a great deal of trouble should problems arise.

Lawn Maintenance Contract

Spring, between March and May, is the perfect time to consider aerating your lawn. If your yard suffers from poor drainage, poor subsoil, or brown, worn grass, then it is definitely a good idea to consider renting an aerator for a day and giving your lawn fresh new life again.

Lawn Maintenance Contract

Should notice be required? Clients probably want at least 30 days’ notice before contract renewal. That way, if they need to make other arrangements, they have a 30-day window.

Lawn Maintenance Contract

Have your contract describe the frequency of service requirements. That is, is it weekly/bi-weekly/etc.? Next, if the client would like you to come a certain day or time every week, find out when that actually is. God forbid you piss them off on a Sunday morning!

Your lawn will look healthier than it ever has with our excellent mowing, fertilizing, weed control, and core aeration programs. Our clients say they can almost set their clock to our mowing schedule, we are that reliable.

5.1. The Contractor shall not be held liable for damage to items on or below the lawn surface which are not clearly visible or marked such as cables, wires, pipes or sprinkler components.

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