Make Roman Shades

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Make Roman Shades

Thanks for taking the time to post this tutorial! It was super helpful. I just made shades for my baby’s room; he’s due in three weeks and I’m not a very experienced seamstress, but your tutorial made it easy! I made a couple of tweaks to the instructions to fit our needs. For the backing I used blackout material, which makes the room nice and dark (there are a few gaps on the edges where light sneaks in, but overall, it worked really well). The window is quite wide and I couldn’t find material I liked wide enough to make a single shade to cover the window, so I made two shades; I attached the shades to one long 1×2 and attached both shades to the same 1×2; each shade has it’s own pulley system so I can have one shade down and one shade up, if I want to. I took great care to get the widths and lengths of the shades even and sufficient for the window, so I think this method is a bit more work, but worth it in my opinion. I did three columns of washers on each shade, just to be sure the shades pull up easily and neatly each time, this might have been overkill since the shades are fairly narrow (I ended up with six rows of washers across the width of the window since I put two shades side by side), but for a wider shade, I’d definitely add an extra column or more of washers. I used drapery cord for the string (I got it at my local fabric store). It’s just like the cords used for mini blinds and wasn’t very expensive. It looks really sharp and makes the curtains look professional (it looks like you might have used this type of cord on your shades as well). This method was definitely much quicker than sewing pockets for the dowels, however, after getting the dowels glued onto the curtains, I realized I cannot ever wash these shades. If I were doing this again, and especially if I was using expensive material, I’d probably consider sewing pockets for the dowels just so I could wash the shades and not have to make new ones once these get too dirty. Thanks again for the great tutorial!

Make Roman Shades

I made a couple of tweaks to the instructions to fit our needs. For the backing I used blackout material, which makes the room nice and dark (there are a few gaps on the edges where light sneaks in, but overall, it worked really well). The window is quite wide and I couldn’t find material I liked wide enough to make a single shade to cover the window, so I made two shades; I attached the shades to one long 1×2 and attached both shades to the same 1×2; each shade has it’s own pulley system so I can have one shade down and one shade up, if I want to. I took great care to get the widths and lengths of the shades even and sufficient for the window, so I think this method is a bit more work, but worth it in my opinion. I did three columns of washers on each shade, just to be sure the shades pull up easily and neatly each time, this might have been overkill since the shades are fairly narrow (I ended up with six rows of washers across the width of the window since I put two shades side by side), but for a wider shade, I’d definitely add an extra column or more of washers. I used drapery cord for the string (I got it at my local fabric store). It’s just like the cords used for mini blinds and wasn’t very expensive. It looks really sharp and makes the curtains look professional (it looks like you might have used this type of cord on your shades as well).

Make Roman Shades

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Warning, this post is looooong, but it’s necessary. I have read and watched at least 25 posts about DIY roman shades in the last month, and to be honest, a few of the posts made me more confused than ever and I nearly decided to scratch the idea of roman shades in my living room.

Make Roman Shades

I would love to make these shades, I only have one problem. My window is about 140 inches so one of the side brackets on each shade would need to be in the top. My question to you is, would this also work. I have priced shades and they are outrages and I’m pretty sure I could make some that would please me more than ordering some that are very expensive. I am thinking if this works, I have 23 windows in my house that I would work on. thanks

Make Roman Shades

I shouldn’t have been scared. I know that now. But, I’m going to do my very best at explaining how to make Roman shades the EASY way. No more confusing math equations, mini blinds, and don’t cut that string, and times the length of your window times pi gobbledegook.

Make Roman Shades

This method was definitely much quicker than sewing pockets for the dowels, however, after getting the dowels glued onto the curtains, I realized I cannot ever wash these shades. If I were doing this again, and especially if I was using expensive material, I’d probably consider sewing pockets for the dowels just so I could wash the shades and not have to make new ones once these get too dirty.

Make Roman Shades

For the person in the rental home, I once made a Roman shade and used existing roller shade hardware. The shade itself had gotten old and nasty, but the hardware was very durable. I removed the shade from the roller, sewed a pocket at the top of the Roman shade just big enough to slide it over the roller and screwed it into the roller at either end so it wouldn’t bunch up when I raised the shade. Worked like a champ! I also didn’t use dowels at all. The fabric was fairly sturdy and had dots in the pattern. I sewed through front and back when I attached the rings to the back, using the same thread color as the dots so it didn’t show.

Step 11: Now that the dowels are installed, we will create a path for the strings on the back of each shade. I used metal washers for this step. The truth is, you can buy this super cool roman shade ring tape stuff that has rings on it that you can sew to the back of your shades, but I couldn’t find any locally, and personally I thought the washers worked great.

Do you have a window just dying to be spruced up? Unlike standard curtains and blinds, Roman shades create a smooth, streamlined silhouette and allow only the desired amount of light into a room. Not only are they classic and contemporary, but they don’t require a lot of special hardware, making them easy to set up for the novice.

I think that would work, you’ll just want to make sure the tops are secured very firmly to the rod. If you use a 1×2, you can staple it and that’s easy, especially to make adjustments of 1/4 inch or 1/2 inch if the bottom turns out to be a little too long. If you use a rod, you’ll probably want to sew a pocket for the rod (kind of like you do on the bottom of these shades for the bottom dowel). You’ll have to be quite careful that you’ve measured accurately when you make the pocket for the top rod to make sure you get the curtains just the right height and that they are even and not slanted.

I promise, this DIY Roman shade tutorial will be easy to follow. I’ve worked on it for a few weeks, to make sure it’s the best I can do.

Measure the window. This way, you’ll know exactly how much fabric you need. Make sure to measure both wide and long. Though the shade will likely not cover the length of the entire window, you’ll need to choose how much of the window will be covered. This version of the Roman shade is immobile. Determine how much light you want let in before you begin working.

This tutorial is great! I’ve had to read through it a couple times as I’ve decided what I wanted to do with my shades. Someone commented earlier asking about securing the layers together. To me it seems like when you sewed the washers on by adding the loop around the front of the dowel that would hold them together. Hopefully that helps with her question! I had a quick question – we’re renting and adding these to porch doors so I can’t add the 1×2. We were just going to attach the curtains to the rods already on the doors. If I added washers at the top, right under the rods, do you think that would work the same way the eye hooks do for yours? Not sure what other option I have. Thanks!

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