New Garden Plants

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New Garden Plants

Eliminating weeds and getting the soil ready for your flowers and vegetables are important first steps in growing a successful garden. Time spent in preparation reduces the time you’ll have to spend maintaining and weeding your garden over the course of the growing season.Tools and MaterialsString and wooden stakesSpadeGlyphosate herbicide (optional)Hoe or mattockSteel garden rakeSoil testing sample kitSoil amendments, as requiredGarden fork or rototillerChoose the spot. Vegetable gardens and most flowerbeds require at least 6 hours of full sun each day. Choose a level spot — either natural or terraced — that has well-drained soil, if possible (see Testing Soil Drainage). Thick grass or vigorous weed growth usually indicate soil drainage and nutrient levels that will support healthy garden plants.Mark the boundaries. Outline the new garden plot with string and stakes, a hose, or a line of powdered limestone.Eliminate the competition. Remove existing lawn by slicing under the sod with a spade and cutting it into manageable pieces. Add the pieces to your compost or use it to patch bare spots elsewhere. Kill weeds with glyphosate herbicide, pull them by hand, or chop them with a hoe or mattock and rake them up. If time permits, you can smother grass and weeds with old carpeting or black plastic anchored to the ground. For best results, leave the covering in place for several weeks of hot weather.Test the soil. Send a sample of garden soil to a private or cooperative extension office soil-testing lab for nutrient and pH analysis. Call the lab or a local garden center for a collection kit and instructions on how to collect the sample. Test results will tell you which minerals and pH amendments your soil needs to grow healthy vegetables and flowers.Add amendments. Adjust the soil pH — its measure of acidity or alkalinity — by adding ground limestone or sulfur as recommended by the soil test results. Improve the soil fertility, clay soil drainage, and sandy soil water-holding capacity by adding organic material, such as compost, well-rotted livestock manure, or composted fir bark. Apply a 1- to 2-inch layer of organic material over the garden. Turn the soil. Work the amendments into the top 6 to 12 inches of soil with a rototiller or garden fork. Break up large clods and remove rocks and roots. Work the soil only when it is dry enough to crumble easily after squeezing – never when it is saturated with water.TipsThe best time to eliminate weeds and grass is the season before you plan to plant your garden. You can do it just prior to planting, too, but may have more weeds pop up throughout the growing season.Do-it-yourself soil test kits work best for detecting the soil pH, but give only a rough idea of the nutrient levels. Professional tests provide more thorough and accurate information and recommendations. This article is categorized under: Articles → Plants → Edibles → VegetablesArticles → General → Landscaping → Yard and Garden PlanningArticles → General → Garden Care → Soil, Water, and FertilizerArticles → Plants → Flowers → AnnualsArticles → Plants → Flowers → PerennialsArticles → How-To ProjectsArticles → How-To Projects → FlowersArticles → How-To Projects → EdiblesArticles → How-To Projects → LandscapingArticles → How-To Projects → Garden Care

New Garden Plants

Eliminating weeds and getting the soil ready for your flowers and vegetables are important first steps in growing a successful garden. Time spent in preparation reduces the time you’ll have to spend maintaining and weeding your garden over the course of the growing season.Tools and MaterialsString and wooden stakesSpadeGlyphosate herbicide (optional)Hoe or mattockSteel garden rakeSoil testing sample kitSoil amendments, as requiredGarden fork or rototillerChoose the spot. Vegetable gardens and most flowerbeds require at least 6 hours of full sun each day. Choose a level spot — either natural or terraced — that has well-drained soil, if possible (see Testing Soil Drainage). Thick grass or vigorous weed growth usually indicate soil drainage and nutrient levels that will support healthy garden plants.Mark the boundaries. Outline the new garden plot with string and stakes, a hose, or a line of powdered limestone.Eliminate the competition. Remove existing lawn by slicing under the sod with a spade and cutting it into manageable pieces. Add the pieces to your compost or use it to patch bare spots elsewhere. Kill weeds with glyphosate herbicide, pull them by hand, or chop them with a hoe or mattock and rake them up. If time permits, you can smother grass and weeds with old carpeting or black plastic anchored to the ground. For best results, leave the covering in place for several weeks of hot weather.Test the soil. Send a sample of garden soil to a private or cooperative extension office soil-testing lab for nutrient and pH analysis. Call the lab or a local garden center for a collection kit and instructions on how to collect the sample. Test results will tell you which minerals and pH amendments your soil needs to grow healthy vegetables and flowers.Add amendments. Adjust the soil pH — its measure of acidity or alkalinity — by adding ground limestone or sulfur as recommended by the soil test results. Improve the soil fertility, clay soil drainage, and sandy soil water-holding capacity by adding organic material, such as compost, well-rotted livestock manure, or composted fir bark. Apply a 1- to 2-inch layer of organic material over the garden. Turn the soil. Work the amendments into the top 6 to 12 inches of soil with a rototiller or garden fork. Break up large clods and remove rocks and roots. Work the soil only when it is dry enough to crumble easily after squeezing – never when it is saturated with water.TipsThe best time to eliminate weeds and grass is the season before you plan to plant your garden. You can do it just prior to planting, too, but may have more weeds pop up throughout the growing season.Do-it-yourself soil test kits work best for detecting the soil pH, but give only a rough idea of the nutrient levels. Professional tests provide more thorough and accurate information and recommendations.

New Garden Plants

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For 40 years, New Garden Landscaping & Nursery has been the Triad’s foremost resource for landscape and horticultural services and outdoor living products. We are dedicated to providing value and building long-term relationships with our employees, customers and communities. New Garden Landscaping & Nursery proudly serves the Triad, working primarily in and around Greensboro and Winston-Salem. We take great pride in our experienced landscape designers and our skilled landscape installation, landscape maintenance, and retail customer service teams.Landscape DesignersOur designers are passionate about creating landscapes that enhance our client’s lives. The perfect outdoor living space may include patio design with integrated seating walls, low-maintenance plantings, or screening hedges to block unwanted noise or sight lines. Whatever your vision for your landscape, our designers can create a plan and bring it to life with the help of our installation teams. Landscape Contractors New Garden Landscaping & Nursery is a fully licensed and insured full-service landscape contracting company. Our landscape services include complete landscape design and installation, including irrigation and night lighting, natural stone and paver hardscaping, and water features. Landscape MaintenanceOur landscape maintenance and enhancement services include scheduled maintenance programs, one time maintenance or “get well” visits, mulching, seasonal flower programs and custom container gardens, plus lawn feeding and weed and disease control programs.Garden CenterVisit our New Garden Gazebo for flowering plants, trees, shrubs and perennials, houseplants, and home and outdoor decor, plus the advice and products you’re looking for to be a successful home gardener. Whatever your landscaping and outdoor living needs, we are here to serve you, sharing our passion and dedication in everything we do. Let your imagination take root. Contact New Garden today or call 665-0291

New Garden Plants

Welcome to New Garden Plants, an online garden center and mail order company featuring many new annuals, new shrubs, and new perennials. We ship large, jumbo, premium potted plants to your door. We are a small family owned business.

New Garden Plants

The New Garden Society is a non-profit organization that provides therapeutic and vocational horticulture training. In all its endeavors, The New Garden Society partners with host agencies to design and implement programming that supports participants’ wellbeing. Organized in 2013, TNGS responded to students’ voiced need for horticulture instructors in the Massachusetts Department of Corrections. To explore the possibilities for horticulture training at your facility, contact info@thenewgardensociety.org.

New Garden Plants

Each year The New Garden Society trains 100+ incarcerated students in the art and science of plants. In prisons, prison hospitals and youth facilities, our students are 13- 80 years old. Every week in prison classrooms, we teach core horticulture concepts. In prison gardens and greenhouses, students apply these concepts, find healing and build job skills. TNGS’ prison-based trainings are taught by horticulturists, farmers, landscapers and other green industry professionals, bringing their diverse plant expertise and land care experiences to every ‘classroom.’

New Garden Plants

Andropogon gyrans (Elliott‘s beard-grass) – Rare, SOUTHERNElliott’s beard-grass grows on infrequently mown, dry upland meadows and banks, usually found with (but almost always less common) than its close relative broomsedge (Andropogon virginicus). Three small populations were observed in the Township. One of the populations, at the New Garden Airport, was quite large in 2006, but had been reduced to a few plants in 2010. In Pennsylvania it is only found in the southeast, and is vulnerable to natural succession and loss of habitat. Bolboschoenus fluviatilis (River bulrush) – RareA small patch of this rhizomotus sedge growing on the inbound delta mouth of Somerset Lake did not flower, so the identification was not confirmed. In this area it is more commonly found as a fresh-water tidal species. There are no associates that indicate that it was intentionally planted, so it may have been brought in by water fowl.

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