Outdoor Light Switch

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Outdoor Light Switch

Connect the Wires to the New Switch With the ends of the wires stripped, they can be hooked up to the new switch. Wrap the end of the black wire around one of the wire connections on the back of the switch. Repeat with the white wire. Secure the wires with wire-connectors. Note: With the particular sensor-switch used in our demonstration, it made no difference which power-supply wire went to which connection on the back of the switch. Either wire could go to either connection. Follow the wiring instructions that come with the switch you purchase.

Outdoor Light Switch

With the ends of the wires stripped, they can be hooked up to the new switch. Wrap the end of the black wire around one of the wire connections on the back of the switch. Repeat with the white wire. Secure the wires with wire-connectors. Note: With the particular sensor-switch used in our demonstration, it made no difference which power-supply wire went to which connection on the back of the switch. Either wire could go to either connection. Follow the wiring instructions that come with the switch you purchase.

Outdoor Light Switch

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The Outdoor Switch includes the external nightlight I liked on the original iDevices Switch, and this one creates a similar effect, making what could just be another black plastic utility box by your house glow with more style. I wish you could control the nightlight colors like you can with the indoor iDevices Switch, but most buyers won’t sweat it. The Outdoor Switch is too bulky to scream intelligence, but it certainly won’t detract from a modern home exterior.

Outdoor Light Switch

The iDevices Outdoor Switch, available this November for $80 at select Lowe’s locations and on the iDevices website, is a welcome addition to the smart-plug market. The new offering from the company that brought you the iGrill and the Switch will fill the niche of outdoor home electronics that few other smart switches are trying to fill. Many remote switches are already on the market, though, and with Black Friday approaching the question is, why is iDevices asking for 80 bucks? Turns out, between remote access and energy consumption tracking, this Outdoor Switch is worth its price tag.

Outdoor Light Switch

I have a switch that I would like to put in a workshop in a potentially damp location. It’s not going to be outside in the rain, but it’s entirely possible that at some point water might get splashed near it. What’s the best way to make this safe? I can’t find any outdoor-rated switches like “WR” rated outlets, which was my first thought. Should I put an outdoor recepticle cover over it, like this? I’m not sure if the screw holes will line up in the right place. Or is there some other way to make this switch as safe as possible? (Bonus question: if I don’t want to put a GFCI breaker in my distribution panel, can I just use the load terminals on a GFCI outlet and use that to protect the switch & light?)

Outdoor Light Switch

I had a perfect location to put this Outdoor Switch. I have a screened room off the back of the house that is open to the elements, but I wanted to put some outdoor string lighting in the space that would liven the area up in the summer. I was using a bluetooth device that had a switch to turn them on and off, but the iDevice switch is just a lot better solution because I usually have my iPhone with me or at least I am wearing the Apple Watch most of the time.

Outdoor Light Switch

In our project, we run a line from an existing outdoor outlet on the house to a light and receptacle at the edge of a garden path. It incorporates a combination light switch/outlet (Photo 11). The outlet is always hot, and the switch controls only the light. If you don’t have an outdoor box to tap in to, consider installing one on your house.

Outdoor Light Switch

Enter the new smart Outdoor Switch from iDevices, a HomeKit compatible gadget that the company hopes will make outdoor lighting, whether for the holidays or just for your patio, a little easier. Of course, the Outdoor Switch won’t string up your lights for you, but it can schedule or toggle them anytime using the iDevices app, so showing off your handiwork will only take the swipe of a finger.

Customize the Controls, and Reinstall the Wall-Plate Note the customizing controls for adjusting the sensitivity and timing of the light activation. On our switch, the bottom adjustment controlled when the lights come on after someone enters the room. The bottom determines how long the lights stay on after everyone has left the room. Set these controls to your liking before installing the wall-plate (Image 1). With the switch installed and adjusted, reinstall the switch wall-plate (Image 2).

Note the customizing controls for adjusting the sensitivity and timing of the light activation. On our switch, the bottom adjustment controlled when the lights come on after someone enters the room. The bottom determines how long the lights stay on after everyone has left the room. Set these controls to your liking before installing the wall-plate (Image 1). With the switch installed and adjusted, reinstall the switch wall-plate (Image 2).

Test the Wires, and Remove the Switch Remove the wall-plate from the existing switch, and test the wires using a circuit tester — such as the audible-alarm tester used in our demonstration — to be absolutely sure there is no power flowing to the wires you’ll be removing. With our audible tester, a continuous beep would indicate that there is still power. The tester verified that the power was off. With the power turned off, remove the screws that hold the old switch in place.

Cut the Wires The old switch has three wires connected at the back: a black wire, a white wire and a bare ground. The black and white wires will be connected to the new motion-sensor switch, but the ground will not be used. Cut the wires at the back of the old switch.

The old switch has three wires connected at the back: a black wire, a white wire and a bare ground. The black and white wires will be connected to the new motion-sensor switch, but the ground will not be used. Cut the wires at the back of the old switch.

Voice Control Outdoor Switch responds to Siri® and Amazon Alexa, which allows you to control your smart home directly, just by using your voice. Access Anywhere Stay connected even when you’re not at home. Control and monitor your electronics with the free iDevices Connected app, from anywhere. Simple To Setup Plug up to two accessories into your Outdoor Switch and start controlling your electronics with the free iDevices Connected app.

CNET Editors’ Rating Be the first to review! The Good The iDevices Outdoor Switch is convenient, filling a niche not many smart plugs have attempted to fill, and the power tracking will help savvy holiday decorators save money. The Bad You can’t control the dual outlets individually, the price is a little steep, and HomeKit user sharing can be a pain. The Bottom Line The Outdoor Switch lets you flip on your holiday lights from the comfort of your couch and schedule them to turn off after you’re asleep. With the added bonus of energy monitoring and the new remote access, those willing to dish out 80 bucks will get a solid product. 8.0 Overall Features 8.0 Usability 9.0 Design 7.0 Performance 8.0

The Good The iDevices Outdoor Switch is convenient, filling a niche not many smart plugs have attempted to fill, and the power tracking will help savvy holiday decorators save money. The Bad You can’t control the dual outlets individually, the price is a little steep, and HomeKit user sharing can be a pain. The Bottom Line The Outdoor Switch lets you flip on your holiday lights from the comfort of your couch and schedule them to turn off after you’re asleep. With the added bonus of energy monitoring and the new remote access, those willing to dish out 80 bucks will get a solid product.

The old switch has three wires connected at the back: a black wire, a white wire and a bare ground. The black and white wires will be connected to the new motion-sensor switch, but the ground will not be used.

Remove the wall-plate from the existing switch, and test the wires using a circuit tester — such as the audible-alarm tester used in our demonstration — to be absolutely sure there is no power flowing to the wires you’ll be removing. With our audible tester, a continuous beep would indicate that there is still power. The tester verified that the power was off. With the power turned off, remove the screws that hold the old switch in place.

Once the switch is mounted in the box, you’ll need a weatherproof cover. You’ll have a couple options here. You can get one with a flip up lid, where the cover has to be flipped up before the switch can be toggled.

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