Seeding A Lawn

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Seeding A Lawn

A beautiful lawn starts with high-quality grass seed and professional seeding. If you’re thinking of seeding or re-seeding your property, contact Lawn Doctor and ask about our lawn seeding services. We offer expert guidance in choosing the right grass seed mixture for your lawn, ensure your lawn is properly prepped for lawn seeding, and apply your lawn’s grass seed using equipment that promotes strong roots and thick, beautiful turf.

Seeding A Lawn

When soil becomes compacted, the lawn struggles to take in oxygen, water, and other critical items needed to grow properly. A well-aerated lawn, on the other hand, gives fresh seeds a better chance to absorb nutrients and develop stronger roots. Speak with us about how much your lawn could benefit from combining lawn seeding with lawn aeration services. Lawn Doctor franchises offer core aeration, which – when coupled with Turf Tamer power seeding – can multiply the effectiveness of lawn maintenance and let your grass grow greener than ever.

Seeding A Lawn

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There are three general categories of seeding: spot seeding, lawn renovation and overseeding a lawn, and renovation. What type is right for growing grass on your lawn depends on the condition of your turf. Spring-Green professionals can help with all of your lawn seeding questions and needs.

Seeding A Lawn

Lawn renovation is for lawns that have excessive thatch, or are so thin, that only a complete rebuild will get the lawn back on its feet. Lawn renovation can be done several ways: old sod can be removed with a sod cutter; the lawn can be de-thatched and seeded; or slice-seeding can be used. Slice-seeding (or verticut seeding) is probably the best for growing grass because it “drills” the seed into the soil without having to remove a large amount of thatch.

Seeding A Lawn

Seeding a New or Existing Lawn Seeding a New Lawn Using seed is the most common method of planting turfgrass. Whether you have an established lawn or you are starting a new one, the basic principles are the same. 1. Dig or till to a 3-inch depth. 2. Rake to remove clumps and clods. 3. Smooth and level the surface. Remember, you are establishing a finished grade so include any contours needed for drainage. 4. Add compost, topsoil and starter fertilizer and work them into the soil. 5. Roll with a weighted lawn roller. 6. Spread the seed. To ensure even coverage, sow half of the seed in one direction and the other half at a right angle. 7. Rake and roll again. 8. Mulch with a weed-free straw, such as wheat straw. As an alternative, you can use a seed starter mat or seed blanket to help keep the seed and loose soil from washing or blowing away. 9. Water frequently to keep the seeds moist (don’t saturate). Cut watering back to once a day when the grass reaches about 1 inch in height. 10. Mow when the grass reaches 2 1/2 inches – 3 inches. 11. After it’s been mowed three times, use a regular watering schedule of 1 inch per week. 12. Apply a pre-emergent crabgrass control to stop germination of unwanted grass. Overseeding an Existing Lawn To fill out an otherwise healthy lawn or to add extra green for the winter months, you can overseed: 1. Mow lower than usual. 2. Dethatch if needed or rake to thin the existing turf. 3. Aerate to reduce soil compaction. 4. Amend with compost. 5. Add starter fertilizer. 6. Apply seed. 7. Rake in loosely. 8. Top-dress with mulch, compost or peat moss.

Seeding A Lawn

It’s true that seeding can be successful any time of year, but spring and summer lawn seeding require more care and water, and weeds and crabgrass cause a lot more competition. Seeding a lawn in late summer or fall is ideal. Early fall is preferred because seeds can germinate faster in the warm soil and continue to establish itself through the cooler weather of fall and winter. There’s also more natural water in the fall so less sprinkling is needed.

Seeding A Lawn

Seed and feed on the same day Which goes on first, the seed or the lawn food? It’s up to you. Either way, use a drop or rotary spreader. Just follow the settings on the packages. You want to feed on the same day with Scotts® Starter® Lawn Food for New Grass to give your new grass seedlings a head start. Cover Up After the seeds and Starter® lawn food are laid down, cover the seeds with a thin layer of Scotts® Turf Builder® Lawn Soil™. You can do this by gently dragging the back of a leaf rake over your seeded area. On hills, mulch with a thin layer of straw to keep seeds from washing away. Make sure you can plainly see the seedbed beneath the straw. You can also mulch with straw on the rest of your new lawn to help cut back on water use. Keep on watering After all your efforts, you don’t want your grass seed to dry out. Make sure the top inch of soil in your new lawn stays moist. You may need to lightly water two or three times a day. Keep at it until your seedlings are well-established. Once your new lawn has reached a mowing height, you can reduce the frequency and start watering thoroughly once or twice a week. Maintenance Great, your new lawn is growing vigorously. Now you have to cut it. Make sure you only mow the top third of the grass blades. Adjust your mower to high setting to keep the lawn nice and thick. When you cut it too short, weeds can sneak in. » Find out how to care for new grass here.

Seeding a New Lawn Using seed is the most common method of planting turfgrass. Whether you have an established lawn or you are starting a new one, the basic principles are the same. 1. Dig or till to a 3-inch depth. 2. Rake to remove clumps and clods. 3. Smooth and level the surface. Remember, you are establishing a finished grade so include any contours needed for drainage. 4. Add compost, topsoil and starter fertilizer and work them into the soil. 5. Roll with a weighted lawn roller. 6. Spread the seed. To ensure even coverage, sow half of the seed in one direction and the other half at a right angle. 7. Rake and roll again. 8. Mulch with a weed-free straw, such as wheat straw. As an alternative, you can use a seed starter mat or seed blanket to help keep the seed and loose soil from washing or blowing away. 9. Water frequently to keep the seeds moist (don’t saturate). Cut watering back to once a day when the grass reaches about 1 inch in height. 10. Mow when the grass reaches 2 1/2 inches – 3 inches. 11. After it’s been mowed three times, use a regular watering schedule of 1 inch per week. 12. Apply a pre-emergent crabgrass control to stop germination of unwanted grass. Overseeding an Existing Lawn To fill out an otherwise healthy lawn or to add extra green for the winter months, you can overseed: 1. Mow lower than usual. 2. Dethatch if needed or rake to thin the existing turf. 3. Aerate to reduce soil compaction. 4. Amend with compost. 5. Add starter fertilizer. 6. Apply seed. 7. Rake in loosely. 8. Top-dress with mulch, compost or peat moss.

Before You Start a Lawn Seeding Project There are a few things to think about to help your grass get off to a good start: A healthy lawn needs good soil. Most turfgrasses prefer neutral soils. To be sure that your efforts aren’t in vain, always perform a soil test first and make the recommended amendments. Don’t apply a weed preventer (liquid or granular) or use weed and feed fertilizer when planning to sow grass. You can control weeds only after you have mowed new grass seedlings at least four times. Any weed controls applied when you sow seed will prevent germination or kill immature seedlings. Test and Improve Your Soil Shop for Soil Test Kits CautionWhen using lawn treatments or lawn care products, always follow package directions regarding proper clothing, protective equipment, application procedures and safety precautions.

Once amending is complete, rake the soil surface smooth and then broadcast the seed evenly, according to recommended seeding rates and using a drop or broadcast spreader. Remember to carefully review the seed package label instructions, as misapplication of seed can lead to unsatisfactory results. The type of spreader you use depends on your turf situation. A drop spreader features two wheels and a bucket for seed. As you push the spreader, it drops seed in a straight path. This type of spreader is ideal if you have a small (less than 5,000 sq. ft.) lawn or want to get seed to a specific area. It’s also fairly easy to maneuver in tight spaces. A broadcast/rotary spreader comes in walk-behind and hand-held types. It spreads seed by fanning it out in all directions, providing more uniform coverage. These spreaders are ideal for large lawns, but make reaching edges difficult. Once you finish spreading the seed, use a rake to lightly work it into the soil at a depth of about 1/4 inch. Don’t bury the seeds any deeper, as they require adequate light to germinate quickly. Follow raking by passing over the area with a roller, which will ensure good seed-to-soil contact. Overseeding — planting grass seed into existing turf — provides the opportunity to improve your lawn’s overall look and health, thicken the turf to minimize weeds, fill in bare or damaged areas and/or convert to another type of lawn. Broadcast the seed over the lawn and water it well. Follow the same watering instructions as for new lawns.

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