Types Of Kitchen Cabinets

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Types Of Kitchen Cabinets

Cabinets form the backbone of the kitchen and may add value, function and beauty to your kitchen. In its simplest form, a cabinet is just a box on the wall. Yet, after layout, the next most important factor in kitchen design is the choice of cabinets. There are three types of basic cabinets: wall, base and tall. Variations on these basic cabinets will function to store specific cookware, display art or dishware and reinforce a style with special cabinet design. Cabinets can be combined to form another cabinet type. For example, stacked wall cabinets can form a tall utility or pantry cabinet that reaches from floor to ceiling. Combining base and wall cabinets for an island can create a unique design.  A drawer base cabinet can be stacked with a wall cabinet to configure a wall oven cabinet. Combinations of basic cabinets can be used to create an endless assortment of custom kitchens.

Types Of Kitchen Cabinets

Types of Cabinets There are three basic types of cabinetry: stock, semi-custom and custom cabinets. Each type provides different advantages depending on your needs and budget. Stock cabinets are at an entry level price point with limited options. Semi-custom cabinets offer more styles, finishes and features than stock cabinets, while custom cabinets offer the widest breadth of wood types, finishing options, construction platforms and modifications. Learn More »

Types Of Kitchen Cabinets

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There are three basic types of cabinetry: stock, semi-custom and custom cabinets. Each type provides different advantages depending on your needs and budget. Stock cabinets are at an entry level price point with limited options. Semi-custom cabinets offer more styles, finishes and features than stock cabinets, while custom cabinets offer the widest breadth of wood types, finishing options, construction platforms and modifications.

Types Of Kitchen Cabinets

There are three basic types of cabinetry: stock, semi-custom and custom cabinets. Each type provides different advantages depending on your needs and budget. Stock cabinets are at an entry level price point with limited options. Semi-custom cabinets offer more styles, finishes and features than stock cabinets, while custom cabinets offer the widest breadth of wood types, finishing options, construction platforms and modifications. Learn More »

Types Of Kitchen Cabinets

The obvious – wall cabinets are cabinets that mount to the wall. Wall cabinets have the most design flexibility: three different heights, multiple widths, custom depth options and glass door options. Wall cabinets stacked as base and tall cabinets from floor to ceiling create an accent wall that can house everything from cookbooks to appliances. Wall cabinets can extend to the ceiling, making use of high spaces for storing infrequently used specialty serveware and cookware.

Types Of Kitchen Cabinets

Studio 212 Interiors Shaker. The Shaker-style cabinet door is the most common door style in kitchens today. This five-piece flat-panel style has a frame made from four pieces and a single flat center panel for the fifth piece. Shaker cabinetry gets its name from the distinctive Shaker furniture style, which uses simple, clean lines and emphasizes utility. Shaker-style doors became popular because their simple style lends itself to just about any decor — from contemporary to traditional — with variations in wood species, stains, paint colors and hardware. This classic style can work with a variety of budgets, depending on the wood used. Some manufacturers can even replace the center door panel with a more cost-effective material. Using a natural finish rather than a painted one could save you up to 20 percent on your purchase, too. Georgetown Development Louvered. Horizontal wood slats are typically used on windows, furniture pieces and interior doors, but they add a distinct architectural style to kitchen cabinetry. However, be aware that these beauties come with a heavy price tag.Many louvered doors have spaces between each slat, making them great for cabinets that require ventilation — like a cabinet near a radiator, a dedicated clothes drying cabinet in a laundry room or cabinetry for cable boxes and DVD players. Applegate Tran Interiors Flat. Simple but stylish, the flat-panel cabinet door is void of any expensive details. Its hard lines and minimalist form make it a great fit for contemporary and modern interiors.Many flat doors come in decorative laminate or wood. Laminate tends to be more budget friendly and offers a greater variety of colors and sheens. Dresser Homes Inset. Although this style tends to be one of the most expensive on the market, it’s a classic look that’ll last for generations. The inset door gets its name because it is set inside of the cabinet frame — typical cabinet doors rest on the outside of the frame. The door is designed and constructed with extremely precise measurements so that it nests inside the frame and opens and closes properly, even when the wood expands and contracts. This door style usually requires exposed hinges rather than the typical concealed hinges of other door styles that are included in the cost of the cabinet box. Make sure that your budget takes this into account — two hinges per door will quickly add up. GDC Construction Distressed. If you’ve always dreamed of having an antique-style kitchen, then you’ll love the distressed-looking cabinets available from most manufacturers. Choose any door style and opt to have the corners rubbed off or have other distressing techniques done for that age-old feeling. All this extra work will cost you, though; there’s usually a 15 to 20 percent upcharge for a tradesperson to actually destroy your brand-new doors. Pinto Designs and Associates Beadboard. Love cottage style? It doesn’t get more cottage chic than beadboard. The center panel of the cabinet doors in this style are made to look like traditional beadboard paneling. Beadboard was used in the past as a decorative wall treatment before plaster, drywall and paint became common. While all-white beadboard cabinetry can give your kitchen a bright and clean feel, all the little cracks and crevasses on this door style can be a pain to keep clean. JMA INTERIOR DESIGN Thermofoil. These doors are molded out of MDF (medium-density fiberboard), wrapped in a plastic-type coating and then baked under intense heat to create an impervious seal. Durable and cost effective, they come only in solid colors and imitation wood grain. Often mass-produced, thermofoil cabinetry comes at very competitive price points. It’s durable, but it’s also extremely difficult to repair any damage to it. Some lighter colors can also yellow from sunlight and heat over time. Frederick + Frederick Architects Custom. Can’t find any door style on the market that really complements your unique design intention? Design your own! Contact a local designer or craftsperson to help you create a personalized design. This Shaker-style cabinet door has a center panel of corrugated metal instead of wood for an industrial and utilitarian look that can stand up to years of abuse.More help choosing kitchen cabinets and hardware

Types Of Kitchen Cabinets

Stock. Purchased pre-sized from their manufacturer, stock cabinets are a basic and economical option. Stock cabinets are mass-produced, available in fixed sizes and cannot be altered, making them less versatile for existing spaces. These cabinets are constructed on site from modular units. Stock cabinets are size-specific, measured in 3-inch increments. Stock cabinet materials range from particleboard covered with plastic laminates or melamime to solid wood, depending on the manufacturer. They offer a relatively limited range of accessories. While some stock materials only meet minimal standards and aren’t generated from valued woods, thoughtfully purchased stock cabinets may offer attractive and affordable style without sacrificing quality. The price of installation for stock cabinetry is typically not included in their purchase price.

Types Of Kitchen Cabinets

Semi-Custom. With a broader selection in both style and material, semi-custom cabinetry generally marks the mid-range option in terms of price point. Semi-custom cabinetry allows some size adjustments and usually offers better quality cabinet construction. “These are special order cabinets. They’re standard in certain sizes but can be altered for increased depth,” says home improvement center specialist Wanda Edwards Lee. “They offer some changes but not all.” Semi-custom cabinetry boasts an extensive selection of styles, finishes, storage solutions and decorative enhancements, featuring a personalized look at a reasonable price point. Semi-custom cabinets consist of everything from stock cabinets fitted with custom doors to made-to-order cabinets selected from a manufacturer’s catalogue of featured styles, materials and finishes. Price of semi-custom cabinets usually includes installation.

Tall Cabinets Tall cabinets, also called pantry cabinets or utility cabinets, create bountiful storage and a dramatic vertical look in a space. Typical tall cabinets will range in height from 84 inches to 96 inches as one unit. Learn More »

Subscribe Face Frame Cabinets 0 / 6 Face frame or traditional cabinets are characterized by the frame, or face that masks the raw edges of each cabinet box. Hinges are sometimes visible from the outside. The doors and drawers can be flush fit (they are recessed into the frame of the cabinet), partially inset (doors and drawers are partially inset into the cabinet with a lip on the outer edge), or overlay (doors overlap the face frame.) Photo: Laurey W. Glenn Kitchen Cabinet Types Choose the best look for your kitchen with this complete cabinet and door style overview. Skip ad in seconds Skip Ad

Subscribe Face Frame Cabinets 0 / 6 Face frame or traditional cabinets are characterized by the frame, or face that masks the raw edges of each cabinet box. Hinges are sometimes visible from the outside. The doors and drawers can be flush fit (they are recessed into the frame of the cabinet), partially inset (doors and drawers are partially inset into the cabinet with a lip on the outer edge), or overlay (doors overlap the face frame.) Photo: Laurey W. Glenn Kitchen Cabinet Types Choose the best look for your kitchen with this complete cabinet and door style overview.

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