Wicker Chair Repair

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Wicker Chair Repair

Keep your wicker away from heat sources for a longer life. Wicker is a timeless material that has been used to make outdoor and indoor furniture for many years. It looks beautiful in nearly any setting, is lightweight and comfortable. Over time and exposure to the weather, however, the wicker will typically crack, break or unravel. If you have a wicker chair and the leg is no longer in good shape, rewrap the wicker yourself and save the expense of buying a new chair. google_ad_channel = ‘6887971154’; google_ad_client = ‘pub-3235755782694080’; google_ad_output = ‘js’; google_max_num_ads = ‘1’; google_ad_type = ‘text’; google_image_size = ‘180×150’; google_feedback = ‘on’; google_skip = google_adnum; google_url = ‘bottom’; google_label_text = ‘Sponsored link’; Repairing a Crack 1Apply linseed oil with a soft brush to any cracking wicker on the chair leg, or any area that has noticeable gaps or crevices in the cane. Use enough oil so that the gap is completely filled. 2Allow the oil to soak into the wicker. When it has been absorbed, repeat the process until the oil sits on top of the wicker and no longer soaks in. 3Dab the wicker leg with a clean cloth to absorb all of the excess oil. 4Allow the chair to dry for 24 hours. The crack or gap on the chair leg will gain strength from the application of the oil and remain intact for a longer period of time. Repairing Broken Strands 1Locate the damaged area on the leg and cut the wicker cane off with a utility knife where the damage begins and ends. 2Purchase wicker cane at a hobby or craft store. Look for cane that is the same diameter as the chair leg you are repairing. 3Cut the amount of cane that you will need to do the repair and place it in water to soak for half an hour. 4Glue the end of the cane where the cut was made to the chair leg frame. Tuck the end of the new piece in under the cane near the glued end and glue it in place on the back side of the leg. Use a push pin to hold it in place until the glue dries. 5Wrap the new strand of wicker around the chair leg. Typically, the wicker on a chair leg is simply wound around in a straightforward manner. If there is a pattern to the weaving, try to match it, but don’t be too concerned if you can’t duplicate it perfectly. If the pattern requires weaving, use a needle-nose pliers. 6Tuck the end of the cane under another strand in an inconspicuous spot. The back of the leg is the best place to end the weaving. Glue the end in place and hold it with a push pin. Allow the glue to dry before using the chair. Things You Will Need Linseed oil Soft brush Clean cloth Utility knife Wicker cane Bowl of water Carpenter’s glue Push pins Needle-nose pliers Tip When wrapping the wicker around the leg, keep it tight. google_ad_channel = ‘4818890251’; google_ad_client = ‘pub-3235755782694080’; google_ad_output = ‘js’; google_max_num_ads = ‘4’; google_ad_type = ‘text’; google_image_size = ‘336×280’; google_feedback = ‘on’; google_skip = google_adnum; google_url = ‘bottom’; google_label = ‘top’; google_label_text = ‘Sponsored Links’; Photo Credits Jupiterimages/Polka Dot/Getty Images Suggest a Correction Wicker Furniture Repair Supplies What Type of Paint to Use for Outdoor Wicker Sets? How to Repair a Rattan Chair How to Reweave a Wicker Bottom Chair google_ad_client = ‘pub-3235755782694080’; google_ad_channel = ‘9557755723’; google_ad_output = ‘js’; google_max_num_ads = ‘5’; google_ad_type = ‘text’; google_image_size = ‘160×600’; google_feedback = ‘on’; google_url = ‘bottom’; google_label = ‘top’; google_label_text = ‘Sponsored Links’;

Wicker Chair Repair

Wicker in good condition can be maintained by regular vacuuming. Wipe it afterward with a cloth dipped in mild household detergent that is safe for woodwork.Scrubbing with a bristle brush dipped in the same solution will remove grime from stubborn areas. A spray-on cleaner can also be used.When exposed to sunlight for extended periods, wicker dries out, causing the fibers to become brittle and sometimes split.Spraying the piece with water and allowing it to dry in the shade is the accepted way to avoid cracking. But to avoid damaging fibers and glue joints, this should be done only when necessary, at most once or twice a year.Humidity, when there is no direct sunlight, can foster mildew on wicker.Stains and odor caused by this fungus can be removed by washing the piece with a solution of one-quarter cup household laundry bleach to one quart of water, or by using a commercial mildew remover (available at hardware stores and many supermarkets) that is safe for wood.This treatment can lighten some wicker fibers, so you might have to wash the entire piece to keep its color uniform. When using bleach or mildew remover, wear goggles and rubber gloves with cuffs.Mildewed cushions should be washed or professionally cleaned, and aired frequently in sunlight to prevent mildew from recurring.When wicker with a clear finish (lacquer, shellac or varnish) becomes dull, you can usually restore its luster by rubbing with a soft cloth dampened with furniture polish or lemon oil.Minor scratches can be disguised by rubbing with a wax-stick scratch remover, available at home centers and some furniture stores.Unfinished wicker needs protection from humidity and should be kept indoors; over the years, shrinking and swelling of fibers will shorten the lifespan of a piece.But it can be prepared for outdoor use without sacrificing its unfinished appearance by brushing it with penetrating waterproofing sealer. The sealer will darken the fibers but not coat them with a shiny glaze. To get an idea of the effect, dampen an area of unfinished fiber with water. Sealer will produce approximately the same results.Worn spots in clear-finished lacquer can be touched up with lacquer or varnish, either sprayed on or applied with a small paintbrush, to avoid clogging the weave. Painted wicker can be treated the same way, but if many spots require attention, you may have to repaint the entire piece to camouflage the touch-ups.To refinish or repaint wicker, first clean it thoroughly. Then brush on a liquid sanding preparation (sold in paint or hardware stores), which will remove grease and oil from the surface and soften the existing finish to enhance bonding with the new.

Wicker Chair Repair

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Wicker is a timeless material that has been used to make outdoor and indoor furniture for many years. It looks beautiful in nearly any setting, is lightweight and comfortable. Over time and exposure to the weather, however, the wicker will typically crack, break or unravel. If you have a wicker chair and the leg is no longer in good shape, rewrap the wicker yourself and save the expense of buying a new chair.

Wicker Chair Repair

Repair Loose Wrapping on the Legs To repair a chair leg on which wicker wrapping has come loose, cut a length of wicker caning and soak it in water for about 30 minutes (Image 1) to make it more flexible. Apply a dab of glue under the end of the loose wrapping, then insert the end of the new strand, and tap it in place with a small tack (Image 2). Wrap the length of new cane snugly around the leg (Image 3), and add a dab of glue where it ends. Secure the end with another tack, and cut off any excess caning (Image 4).

Wicker Chair Repair

Repair Broken Strands in the Body The technique for replacing a missing or broken strand of caning in the body of a wicker piece is similar to that described above. Soak a length of wicker strand in water for about 30 minutes. With a utility knife, cut off any protruding ends of the old strand (Image 1), and if possible, glue the end to the underside of an intersecting piece of cane. Once the new strand has softened, cut off a section slightly longer than the length of the piece being replaced. Place a small amount of glue inside the woven strands. Tuck one end into the woven wicker, next to the broken strand, and begin weaving the new piece in the same pattern as the old (Image 2), using a pair of needle-nose pliers to assist if necessary. Once the new strand is in place, cut off any excess, and tuck the end underneath an intersecting piece.

Wicker Chair Repair

This is an important question to ask when taking on any DIY task. If the wicker itself or the structure of the furniture is too badly damaged, it would be a waste of money putting any effort into it. If your wicker furniture is of value to you – i.e. it’s a family heirloom or it’s a pricey antique piece—then you may want to consider doing some slight repairs. If you have a vintage piece, then care and repair will be essential to maintaining the longevity of your wicker furniture, even it if is in good condition.

Wicker Chair Repair

Wicker Chair Repair

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