Home Theater Projectors

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Home Theater Projectors

Home Theater Projectors Home Theater Projectors Putting together a home theater system can be difficult. All the equipment needs to be compatible to give an audience the best viewing experience. Due to strides in technology, audio devices can make movies and television shows sound crystal clear, but a standard high-definition television’s picture might lag behind a sound system’s performance. Buying the best home theater projector could level the playing field. If you’re going to be watching a great deal of programming, a projector might be easier on the eyes than an LCD or LED television. The devices are backlit to create a sharper image on screen, while sending light directly into your vision. This is what usually causes eye strain after watching for an extended period of time. Projectors are only directing light toward the screen, making it more comfortable to enjoy a movie marathon. There is more flexibility with a home theater projector, as well. Instead of having a television with a set size, a projector can be adjusted to fill bigger and smaller display areas. Moving the device further away from the screen creates a bigger image, while moving it closer shrinks it. This is a convenient adjustment for users who want to use their device in more than one room. It is important to note the minimum and maximum size settings on each projector, because picture quality will deteriorate if moved beyond those thresholds. You may want to consider the lamp life of a projector before making a purchase. Light bulbs don’t last forever, so at some point you’ll need to replace one in your device. Most projectors offer settings designed to lengthen a bulb’s life, but these options may reduce viewing quality while cutting down on power consumption. It’s important to consider all your needs before buying a home theater projector. Make sure you have figured out what you expect from the device and what you’ll use it for, so you can buy the best one for your home theater.

Home Theater Projectors

Most projectors are either LCD-based or they use a Texas Instruments DLP (Digital Light Projection) chip along with a laser, LED, or LCOS (liquid crystal on silicon) light source. Single-chip DLP projectors are potentially subject to what is known as the rainbow effect. Little red-green-blue rainbow-like flashes may be visible, particularly in scenes with bright areas against a dark background. In some DLP projectors, the effect is minimal, but in projectors where the effect is average to severe, people who are sensitive to these artifacts will likely find them distracting, particularly with video. LCD projectors are immune to this effect, so they’re a safer bet if you or someone in your family is sensitive to the rainbow effect. That said, there are plenty of DLP projectors with excellent image quality.

Home Theater Projectors

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Home Theater Projectors Putting together a home theater system can be difficult. All the equipment needs to be compatible to give an audience the best viewing experience. Due to strides in technology, audio devices can make movies and television shows sound crystal clear, but a standard high-definition television’s picture might lag behind a sound system’s performance. Buying the best home theater projector could level the playing field. If you’re going to be watching a great deal of programming, a projector might be easier on the eyes than an LCD or LED television. The devices are backlit to create a sharper image on screen, while sending light directly into your vision. This is what usually causes eye strain after watching for an extended period of time. Projectors are only directing light toward the screen, making it more comfortable to enjoy a movie marathon. There is more flexibility with a home theater projector, as well. Instead of having a television with a set size, a projector can be adjusted to fill bigger and smaller display areas. Moving the device further away from the screen creates a bigger image, while moving it closer shrinks it. This is a convenient adjustment for users who want to use their device in more than one room. It is important to note the minimum and maximum size settings on each projector, because picture quality will deteriorate if moved beyond those thresholds. You may want to consider the lamp life of a projector before making a purchase. Light bulbs don’t last forever, so at some point you’ll need to replace one in your device. Most projectors offer settings designed to lengthen a bulb’s life, but these options may reduce viewing quality while cutting down on power consumption. It’s important to consider all your needs before buying a home theater projector. Make sure you have figured out what you expect from the device and what you’ll use it for, so you can buy the best one for your home theater.

There are four basic kinds of content you can view with a projector: data, video, photos, and games. Most projectors can handle all of them, but each type has its strengths. Business (or data) projectors tend to be best at displaying data presentations, like PowerPoint slides, PDFs, Excel files, and the like. Consumer or home models, such as home entertainment, home theater, and video projectors are more geared to video viewing. Projectors that do well with video also tend to be good with photos. Gaming projectors are a small, but growing, niche and feature lower input lag.

Each year we have had a chance to review the large majority of new home theater projectors announced at the annual CEDIA show, which is held in September or October. Most of the projectors announced at this event begin shipping between September and February.  Since the bulk of each year’s newly announced projectors are 1080p, the report focuses on these higher resolution projectors, but now also includes those new 4K projectors.

Most home projectors offer multiple connection methods. Nearly all new models provide HDMI connectivity, which is good because it supports video resolutions of 1080p. Larger projectors have standard HDMI ports, while palmtop, pico, and other small projectors often have mini or micro HDMI ports, which require different cables (usually included with the projector). Many home entertainment and home theater models have ports compatible with HDMI 1.4a, enabling projection from a Blu-ray player or set-top box, as well as a computer. Some come with HDMI ports that support MHL, providing a wired connection to compatible phones and tablets. Some projectors connect via Wi-Fi, and may support media streaming via Intel Wireless Display (WiDi) and/or Miracast.

The home theater projectors page includes the latest projectors used for home theater and home entertainment. See below for a list of reviews of home theater projectors, and also  information pages. They are listed in order, most recent first.

We've chosen five top-rated home theater projectors that deliver tremendous visual impact without demanding a serious remodeling of your room. We do not include projectors in this review that dip below 1080p resolution. That does mean we've left out some of the cheaper options, but if the image is not clear and sharp in the first place, enlarging it will only exaggerate the flaws. We do not accept products directly from manufacturers for our reviews; we use our own funds to purchase the same “off-the-shelf” products that you do. And when we've finished our testing and consumer reviews, we donate all these products to charities and other non-profit organizations. Our top contenders for home theater projectors are: Follow us on Facebook! Get exclusive content, advice, and tips from BestReviews delivered to your inbox. Stay Updated

We've chosen five top-rated home theater projectors that deliver tremendous visual impact without demanding a serious remodeling of your room. We do not include projectors in this review that dip below 1080p resolution. That does mean we've left out some of the cheaper options, but if the image is not clear and sharp in the first place, enlarging it will only exaggerate the flaws. We do not accept products directly from manufacturers for our reviews; we use our own funds to purchase the same “off-the-shelf” products that you do. And when we've finished our testing and consumer reviews, we donate all these products to charities and other non-profit organizations. Our top contenders for home theater projectors are:

These days even the lowest priced home theater projectors can put up a terrific big screen picture despite their dirt cheap prices. The native resolution of these projectors is 1920 x 1080, which is perfect for the display of Blu-ray movies and Full HD 1080p video from streaming sources like VUDU, Netflix, and Amazon Prime. Most of the projectors below put out plenty of light to fill a 120″ diagonal screen, or even larger. That is 3 times the size of a 70″ flat panel TV – large enough to give you the truly immersive movie theater experience in your own home.

Home theater projectors are designed to be used under theater-dark conditions in a movie room. This can be anything from an elaborate, professionally designed home theater to a mixed-use room that can be set up for viewing movies. Such projectors usually eschew built-in speakers, as their owners prefer to yoke them to high-fidelity audio systems. Image quality, features, and resolution are important—most are 1080p, and many include 3D capabilities. Because you’ll be viewing in a dark room free of ambient light, a home theater projector needn’t be especially bright; you won’t want to go much above 2,000 lumens.

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