Painting Basement Ceiling

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Painting Basement Ceiling

Finishing your basement and looking for a way to maximize your current ceiling height? A great option for a basement with lower ceiling heights can be painting the ceilings! Leaving your basement ceiling exposed and simply painting it black or white can give you the height needed for a comfortable space as well as giving the basement a more industrial, open, loft feel. Using interior Dry Fall paint, the ceiling is evenly coated. Dry Fall paint will ensure proper adhesion to the ceiling surfaces. Applying the paint using a spray method ensures even coverage and minimal product waste. Black Painted Basement Ceiling Painting the ceiling black gives the space an industrial feel, as well as the appearance of higher ceilings. The contrast between the black ceiling and gray walls makes for a dramatic design feature that can help when looking for a modern design in your basement. White Painted Basement Ceiling Another option for the ceiling color is white. The white painted ceiling creates a light airy feel for the space while also giving the appearance of heightened ceilings. Paired with light colored walls the white ceiling creates an open, bright space. Painting your basement ceilings can be a great way to finish your space and keep the costs down while allowing for maximum ceiling height. See what our designers can do for your basement today by contacting us today!

Painting Basement Ceiling

Our exposed basement ceiling has officially been painted and our basement has finally been put back together…okay, almost, but we’re working on it.  The whole basement project started out over a year ago, and one of the steps that took the longest was these first 5 tips in preparation for painting an open beam ceiling.    Pin It

Painting Basement Ceiling

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Unless you’re installing a suspended ceiling in your basement, the joists of the floor above stick down into the ceiling of your basement, making it feel closed in, even if the joists are high. The suspended ceiling covers the joists and other intrusions into your space, such as pipes. However, a cheaper and faster alternative is to disguise the joists by painting them to match your walls or a light color, such as white, that makes the room appear more open.

Painting Basement Ceiling

During my efforts to upgrade my unfinished basement, I wanted an alternative to the typical acoustic tile drop ceiling or drywall ceiling. Fred told me of his tentative plans to paint his open basement ceiling dark brown. After some research, I decided to go with a light color to keep a more open feeling. Airless spraying seemed the only viable option to achieve this, and Fred offered me the use of his Wagner Airless Sprayer. Here’s a picture of the ceiling before the job.

Painting Basement Ceiling

Hi Fred! Great information! I am shocked at the amount of paint and primer this required! Holy cow. My question: I’m having a hard time finding information on ventilating an enclosed basement while spraying…. I only have two “vent” windows in the entire basement. They are on the side of the basement I want to paint, but incredibly small. I can of course blow fans… but that will just blow the fumes and spray around, not necessarily ventilate it out of the basement….? How do people do this with a traditional below ground basement? – AND thank you for posting the tip on the refurbished Wagner!

Painting Basement Ceiling

Hey Fred, Did you cover the wires before painting? I’ve got a low (7feet max) basement ceiling in a 75-year-old house. I’ve got a ton of pipes and electrical wires attached to the ceiling… oh, and a million spiders. lol. Aside from vacuuming up the spiders, do you suggest I do any prep to the ceiling before painting? I’d love to paint over the electrical wires and pipes but I don’t know if that’s something I shouldn’t do. Any advice? -Matt

Painting Basement Ceiling

Now that all of the ceiling parts match, and in our case the walls, too, the basement has taken on a fresh, clean and unified look.  It is much more tranquil to enter the basement without all the distraction from before.  It’s so much cleaner feeling.  The layers of paint have actually insulated the basement and have filled in all the nooks and crannies that were virtual welcome signs to insects and spiders.

Painting Basement Ceiling

Tuula @ The Thrifty Rebel February 22, 2015 at 12:51 pm # Wow Amy! What a big job! Your basement ceiling looks a millions times better now. It’s amazing how painting it gives it that fun industrial kinda vibe, where before it had an unfinished basement kinda vibe. It really looks fabulous!!! Reply

Hi Amy! First off, thanks for the detailed instructions and helpful tips. Your basement looks so welcoming now! I have a question about prep, which I didn’t see mentioned in your previous post. Given that most basements are a bit dusty and sometimes cobwebby, how did you tackle cleaning the ceiling before the rest of your painting prep? Does it need to be absolutely spotless before painting begins, or is the sprayer forgiving of a little residual dust on wood beams? It can be tough to get rough wood entirely clean.

LA March 14, 2016 at 1:13 pm # Hi Amy! First off, thanks for the detailed instructions and helpful tips. Your basement looks so welcoming now! I have a question about prep, which I didn’t see mentioned in your previous post. Given that most basements are a bit dusty and sometimes cobwebby, how did you tackle cleaning the ceiling before the rest of your painting prep? Does it need to be absolutely spotless before painting begins, or is the sprayer forgiving of a little residual dust on wood beams? It can be tough to get rough wood entirely clean. Reply

Hi Amy! First off, thanks for the detailed instructions and helpful tips. Your basement looks so welcoming now! I have a question about prep, which I didn’t see mentioned in your previous post. Given that most basements are a bit dusty and sometimes cobwebby, how did you tackle cleaning the ceiling before the rest of your painting prep? Does it need to be absolutely spotless before painting begins, or is the sprayer forgiving of a little residual dust on wood beams? It can be tough to get rough wood entirely clean. Reply

Kevin July 23, 2015 at 3:55 pm # I am going to paint my basement ceiling very soon and in the midst of preping right now. Your post is very helpful in my prep, but the one thing I can not seem to find out information anywhere is about insulation. In between each floor joist that connect to an exterior wall has pink insulation in it to keep the heat in and cold out. Any blog that talks about painting the ceiling never talks about the insulation. Did you guys paint over any pink insulation or did you cover up that insulation or even take it out and put spray form in between the floor joists on outside walls? Reply

I have a few more jotted down here but we’re already pushing my blog post word limit so I’ll have to save those for another time. For more great painting tips check out Jack Pauhl’s website on painting, this guy is my painting hero. All hail Jack Pauhl, you own painting!

With planning, you can get creative with soffits. For example, even if you only need to cover ductwork at one part of your ceiling, you can extend the soffit all the way around the perimeter of your basement to create a two-level ceiling, called a tray ceiling.

don’t know if it’s true or not, but been told here in WI, not finishing the ceiling means that the tax man cannot count a “finished” basement as liveable square footage. nice on the tax bill. have seen several basements that are carpeted/rocked and finished but exposed wood ceiling. looks good. like the blacked out ceiling.

Tip To paint only the joists and not pipes or the subfloor above, use a paint roller and a brush. Climb a ladder and paint the joists by hand. When calculating how many gallons of paint to buy, remember that painting ceiling joists takes more paint than a flat ceiling. Double the measurements of the ceiling to account for the additional surface area of the joists.

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Also, do you know the electrical rules about running wiring through the basement? I had thought if the basement was unfinished, that the cables had to be in conduit. Do you know if this is true? If so, the above basement may not be quite up to code (though I’m sure it is safe).

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