Red Wine Glasses

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Red Wine Glasses

Specialty Wine Glasses All Purpose Wine Glasses If a single glass type is all that your circumstances permit, an all purpose wine glass is the way to go. Although the experience may not be the same as when you use the proper glass type for the application, these glasses offer a similar function at a lower cost and increased efficiency. The bowl shape is in between that of red and white wine glasses, making it acceptable for use with both types of wine. Stemless Wine Glasses Offering the same shapes and styles of bowls as traditional stemmed wine glassware, stemless wine glasses deliver function with modern style and a limited risk of breakage. Wines may be warmed faster than with stemmed glasses, but the stemless design of these pieces exudes a contemporary appearance that’s all the rage and definitely worth the risk. Additionally, since the delicate stems are no longer present in these glasses, less care ought to be required to maintain them.

Red Wine Glasses

Dessert Wine and Fortified Wines Dessert wines are sweet wines and as the name suggests, they are generally served with dessert. Since there are many dessert wine types, a rule of thumb for choosing a wine is that it must be sweeter than the dessert being eaten. Fortified wine is a wine that has been blended with a liquor. The liquor most often used for this is Brandy which is essentially just distilled wine. This gives fortified wines a distinct flavor and a higher alcohol content than normal wine – usually at least %15 ABV. Types of Dessert and Fortified Wines: Bum Wine Ice Wine Late-harvest Rieslings Madiera Marsala Noble Rot Wine Orange Muscat and other Muscat varieties Port Raisin Wine Sherry Vermouth Dessert and Fortified Wine Glasses A dessert or fortified wine glass should be smaller to direct the wine to the back of the mouth so the sweetness doesn’t overwhelm. Dessert wines generally have a higher alcohol content, making small dessert wine glasses perfect for a smaller serving. The same rule of thumb applies to sherry and cordial glasses.

Red Wine Glasses

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Related Resources How to Build a Restaurant Wine List Building a wine list for your restaurant is a great way to attract new customers and enhance your current menu. Suggested meal pairings are a great way to encourage wine sales! It’s not necessary to have every kind of wine when first building a wine list, but choosing a few of the most versatile, common types of red and white wines will be a great addition to your establishment. Serving Tips Red wines are often bold in flavor, great for pairing with savory chicken and beef dishes. It tastes the best when served at room temperature (59 to 64 degrees Fahrenheit), making it easy to serve in a stylish decanter or carafe . Types of red wine to consider include Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Pinot Noir. White wines are available in an array of s Proper Wine Storage Tips Whether you need to properly store a variety of wines for your restaurant or you’re looking for long term storage tips, there are a few things that you must remember. Wine storage isn’t complicated, but there are several factors to take into consideration, such as temperature, humidity, light exposure, and the condition of the cork. We’ll get into all of those aspects in this article and more, including information on wine refrigeration equipment and some of the differences between storing red vs. white. You may also consider hiring or becoming a sommelier if you’re really serious about providing the best possible wine service for your guests. Wine Storage Tips Store it Horizontally You’ve probably seen wine being stored sideways. If you’ve How to Become a Sommelier Although the word sommelier may inspire images of a medieval steward scurrying through dark, damp corridors in a wine cellar with only torchlight to find the perfect bottle of wine for his master, in reality, the established profession of the sommelier, and the organizations that certify those professionals, only recently came into existence in the past several decades. Though the history of the Sommelier is long and rich, it wasn’t until the mid-1900s, when wineries began to estate bottle and label their vintages, that restaurants gained the ability to stock more varied selections, making the need for knowledgeable wine experts all the more crucial. Along with the ever-expanding American palate and growing food culture, comes the need for

Red Wine Glasses

How to Build a Restaurant Wine List Building a wine list for your restaurant is a great way to attract new customers and enhance your current menu. Suggested meal pairings are a great way to encourage wine sales! It’s not necessary to have every kind of wine when first building a wine list, but choosing a few of the most versatile, common types of red and white wines will be a great addition to your establishment. Serving Tips Red wines are often bold in flavor, great for pairing with savory chicken and beef dishes. It tastes the best when served at room temperature (59 to 64 degrees Fahrenheit), making it easy to serve in a stylish decanter or carafe . Types of red wine to consider include Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Pinot Noir. White wines are available in an array of s Proper Wine Storage Tips Whether you need to properly store a variety of wines for your restaurant or you’re looking for long term storage tips, there are a few things that you must remember. Wine storage isn’t complicated, but there are several factors to take into consideration, such as temperature, humidity, light exposure, and the condition of the cork. We’ll get into all of those aspects in this article and more, including information on wine refrigeration equipment and some of the differences between storing red vs. white. You may also consider hiring or becoming a sommelier if you’re really serious about providing the best possible wine service for your guests. Wine Storage Tips Store it Horizontally You’ve probably seen wine being stored sideways. If you’ve How to Become a Sommelier Although the word sommelier may inspire images of a medieval steward scurrying through dark, damp corridors in a wine cellar with only torchlight to find the perfect bottle of wine for his master, in reality, the established profession of the sommelier, and the organizations that certify those professionals, only recently came into existence in the past several decades. Though the history of the Sommelier is long and rich, it wasn’t until the mid-1900s, when wineries began to estate bottle and label their vintages, that restaurants gained the ability to stock more varied selections, making the need for knowledgeable wine experts all the more crucial. Along with the ever-expanding American palate and growing food culture, comes the need for

Red Wine Glasses

Red wine glasses and White wine glasses differ in shape and size, driven by the types of wine they are intended to hold. Typically Red wine glasses will be a bit taller and have a larger bowl than White wine glasses. In general Reds are bigger and bolder wines so they require a larger glass to allow all those aromas and flavors to emerge. “But do I need both types?” While you can certainly get by with one set of glasses, if you expect to drink a number of different varietals you may find that the glassware is holding back your experience, particularly if you opt to drink Red wine out of a smaller White wine glass. Does that mean you won’t enjoy your wine? Most definitely not. While the various shapes and sizes can be overwhelming, a proper varietal-glass pairing can make a tremendous difference.

Red Wine Red wines are made from “black” (red-colored) grapes fermented with the skin included. The skin is what imparts the red color to the wine. Red wines typically have a more robust flavor, and pair well with food that is similarly robust, such as red meats (beef, lamb), hearty pasta dishes, etc. They are usually served at or just below room temperature. Types of Red Wine: Beaujolais Bordeaux Burgundy Cabernet Franc Cabernet Sauvignon Carignan Chianti Grenache Malbec Merlot Petite Sirah Pinot Noir Shiraz Zinfandel Red Wine Glasses Red wines are best served in large wine glasses, like these

White Wine White wines are from either “black” (red-colored) or “white” (green-colored) grapes, fermented without the skin, and are often combined with citrus and spicy flavors. White wines are usually served cold, with lighter foods such as poultry and fish. Types of White Wine: Chardonnay Chenin Blanc Muscadet Muscat Blanc Pinot Gris Riesling Sauvignon Blanc or Fume Blanc Semillon Viognier White Burgundy White Bordeaux White Wine Glasses A white wine glass’ bowl will be more U shaped and upright than that of a red wine glass, allowing the aromas to be released while also maintaining a cooler temperature. The white wine glass style that’s best for younger whites has a slightly larger opening directing the wine to the tip and sides of the tongue to taste its sweetness. The glass for more mature white wines will be straighter and taller to dispense the wine to the back and sides of the tongue to taste its bolder flavors.

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