Soundproof Basement Ceiling

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Soundproof Basement Ceiling

Ceiling:  Usually the ceiling in a basement is bare rafters and if left that way, substantial sound will transmit through it in both ways, up and down.  A ceiling must be in place to have any kind of soundproofing.  Not a drop ceiling, with is virtually worthless for sound control.  What kind of ceiling depends on the noise transfer that is anticipated. If it’s just airborne sounds like people talking, above and below, a simple soundproof ceiling made of of 5/8” “Fire code” Drywall may suffice, with sound isolation tape on the bottom of the joists, depending on what the floor topping is above.

Soundproof Basement Ceiling

Soundproofing Recommendation:  I personally like the soundproof drywall and particularly the QuietRock product for anyone on a budget that wants to seriously reduce sound transmission.  If cost is not an issue and optimal performance is…go with the soundproofing clips/metal furring hat channel and a soundproof drywall.  Keep in mind, your labor cost will be significantly more for the second application.  If you’re doing it yourself, just plan on dedicating more weekend hours to completing your project.  Either way, if you plan on tackling your soundproofing project yourself, make sure you take your time to do each phase properly to maximize your results.  And as always, follow the manufacturer recommendations carefully to ensure a safe and effective installation.  If you want to finish your basement, check out our detailed video series on our main site.

Soundproof Basement Ceiling

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Overhead noise can be harsh — footfalls, stomps, dropped objects — or ambient sound, such as TVs and stereos. To conquer unwanted sounds, you’ll need to soundproof either your ceiling, your floors, or both. If you want full soundproofing, you’ll have to soundproof walls, too.

Soundproof Basement Ceiling

Sound Performance Ratings When evaluating acoustical properties of basement ceilings, there are two types of ratings to review: the Noise Reduction Coefficient (NRC) and the Ceiling Attenuation Class (CAC). NRC is a rating that tells you how much sound a surface will absorb. In practical use, a ceiling NRC rating of 0.50 indicates excellent sound absorption. Compare that to drywall, which typically rates a .05 CAC rates a ceiling’s efficiency as a barrier to sound transmission. In a suspended ceiling chosen for acoustic performance in a basement, the panels prevent most sounds from passing through the ceiling and traveling upstairs. A CAC rating > 35 indicates high performance, meaning little sound is transmitted through the panels Learn About Sound Control

Soundproof Basement Ceiling

Before you undertake any work to soundproof your basement ceiling, you will have to seal it properly. Gaps allow sound to pass, so extensive caulking of all gaps and cracks will reduce sound transmission. Also seal any cracks in the walls.

Soundproof Basement Ceiling

I live in a bottom unit condo and the noise from the condo above is loud and stressful. What can we do to make the ceiling soundproof? We not only hear footsteps, we hear the toilets, shower, bed squeaking, everything except voices.

Soundproof Basement Ceiling

CAC rates a ceiling’s efficiency as a barrier to sound transmission. In a suspended ceiling chosen for acoustic performance in a basement, the panels prevent most sounds from passing through the ceiling and traveling upstairs. A CAC rating > 35 indicates high performance, meaning little sound is transmitted through the panels

Soundproof Basement Ceiling

You might want to use your basement as a home theater, or maybe your kids have a band and want to use the basement for their rehearsals. If you want to use the basement for anything of a noisy nature, soundproofing can be a great idea.

Soundproofing Basement Ceilings Armstrong decorative ceilings can reduce the sound in your basement, improving your enjoyment of your home theater, or game room, home gym, office, or guest bedroom. Unlike drywall ceilings, Armstrong ceiling tiles and panels provide acoustical benefits that can make a big difference in the sound environment of a room. View the Best Sound Blocking Ceilings

For example, Armstrong offers 2-by-2-foot panels that have a step-edged detail or look like embossed or molded plaster. “These are very good for blocking noise generated in the basement and keeping it from invading upstairs,” says a spokesperson for Armstrong’s residential ceilings. “They will give your basement ceiling an STC rating of about 35 and even better performance if you install batt insulation between floor joists,” he adds. (For more about STC, see Soundproofing Walls & Ceilings.)

Before you can install the acoustic tile, assemble the framework for your dropped ceiling. Measure 12-inches from the ceiling, then measure again several times along each wall. Draw a line connecting the measurements to mark where you will attach the outside of the framework for the dropped ceiling.

My family just bought a new ski house. The bedroom where the teenagers sleep is in on the bottom floor, right below the kitchen. In the morning, as soon as people start walking around in the kitchen I wake up. Is there anyway to renovate the floor between the second floor and basement to limit the sound in the basement bedroom a little bit?

The basement walls need to be stripped all the way down to the studs. Using rolls of insulation, fill between each stud, stapling the insulation to the wood to keep it in place. Cover the entire basement with insulation for maximum effect.

Arjun Panday What has been your opinion about sound reduction paint and its application ? chrisk think of it this way: one layer of drywall will improve an exterior wall about 3-5 points. that 5/8″ thick of heavy material. what is a few layers of paint going to do? SE Secondary Glazing has anyone ever thought about secondary glazing? sound proof your room with secondary glazing windows they keep up to 90% of the noise out. ShaneMcGrath Yes, Had whole house done a few years ago, 3mm single pane wooden windows were very old and starting to rot. Replaced with UPVC windows, Got extra thick double glazing. 6mm on outside and 4mm on inside with 20mm air gap, So 3 times more glass. Difference has gone from unbearable neighborhood noise to quiet cozy house and that is with tiled floors! Easily more than 50% reduction in all noise more like 75%, Can’t even tell if there is storm outside can not hear wind or rain just thunder when it’s right over the house. It won’t stop some idiot with an illegal loud after market exhaust system speeding past or your local teen moron with subwoofer cranked up too loud, But it does at least halve the noise of bass. High frequency is where it excels blocking most of it entirely. Low frequency is very hard to block out though, You would need insulated walls,ceilings,floors,windows,doors to really reduce it. If you do get double glazing or even triple glazing, The bigger the air gap the better the noise reduction, preferably 100mm gap but the downside is you lose some thermal efficiency. Going from single 3mm glass to double glazed and 10mm worth of glass has made a huge difference in both noise,heating and cooling but it is expensive. Whole house was around 30k but at least it’s 5 star rated with solar system,insulated ceilings,floors, If house was ever up for sale it will recover the costs. I wouldn’t mind replacing these pathetic and cheap hollow core doors that all houses have now with solid core doors at some point in future to finish it off. pcl After all the obvious flaws, like heating ducts opened on both sides or open gaps, have been addressed, the most effective means of blocking sound, without changing the construction of the walls, that I’ve found is to fill the walls with densely packed insulation, with a few inches of gravel, sand, or mortar mix, at the top. The weight of the latter helps compact the former, though some settling can be expected, so topping it off from once in a long while is a good idea. I’ve been able to fill a whole wall by cutting a 3″ hole with a hole saw at the top of each stud bay, though some types of insulation may require more holes. Milosz_Krasinski Awesome! That’s what I need. CP This is very helpful especially for those with fuzzy tenants in the basement. They don’t want to hear anything even your own fart. Good thing they’re leaving tomorrow and I can start soundproofing the basement.

Armstrong decorative ceilings can reduce the sound in your basement, improving your enjoyment of your home theater, or game room, home gym, office, or guest bedroom. Unlike drywall ceilings, Armstrong ceiling tiles and panels provide acoustical benefits that can make a big difference in the sound environment of a room.

If you ask three builders what they recommend for soundproofing a room, you will get three different answers.  I will first tell you that I am no soundproofing expert.  However, I do like to look at my projects from an efficiency standpoint.  So, for my friend’s basement office, I wouldn’t recommend any of the high cost, high level sound reducing techniques.  Trust me, there are all kinds of expensive ways to reduce noise…just ask the guys that build recording studios.  In many cases, they build a room within a room which provides the ultimate situation for soundproofing.  Here, we will focus on the  items with the biggest bang for your buck.  Because the biggest noise nuisance is coming from the ceiling in my friend’s case, we will focus our soundproofing efforts there for this discussion.

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